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Review: Vanguard Illustrated #7

A werewolf comes to town but soon runs afoul of a gunslinger who looks suspiciously like the Lone Ranger. This story-in-verse by Stephen Perry and George Evans leads off a hodgepodge of not-quite-ready-for-prime-time tales. Also featuring the first appearance of Mr. Monster by Michael T. Gilbert and William Messner-Loebs.

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Review: Captain Canuck #1

In the not-too-distant future, Captain Canuck must thwart an invasion of world superpower Canada by a group of underground Communists. Richard Comely’s labor of love swells with Canadian pride but is brought down by its amateurish art.

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Review: Charlton Bullseye #1

The Question and Blue Beetle team to rescue Beetle’s Bug from the clutches of the Enigma. This Charlton experiment with free labor isn’t a total debacle, but the work of writer Benjamin Smith (with “A. Committee” and “Anon O. Mouse”) and artists Dan Reed and Al Val isn’t quite ready for prime time.

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Review: The Southern Knights #3

An assassin comes after the Southern Knight’s new benefactor, leading the team to bust a local drug operation. This first comic-book-sized issue of The Southern Knights is a major step down from their earlier outings. By Henry Vogel, Audrey Vogel, new artist Michael Morrison and others.

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Review: Phoenix #4

A second group of aliens stop Phoenix’s suicide attempt, turn him into the Protector and send him to battle a cyclops. A victim of the dreaded Atlas-(Seaboard)-last-issue revamp, this outing by the new creative team of Gary Friedrich and Ric Estrada is pretty much a bust.

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Review: Spider-Man: Christmas in Dallas

In Dallas on a photo assignment, Peter Parker soon finds himself swinging into action to thwart the Kingpin’s Christmas plot. This promotional comic from the Dallas Times Herald – by the team is Jim Salicrup, Alan Kupperberg and Mike Esposito – is not much of a holiday treat.

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Review: The Grim Ghost #3

When Hell comes under siege from the demon Brimstone, the Grim Ghost finds himself coming to the aid of Satan. A silly story from Tony Isabella – but not a bad one. The same can not be said for the art, a subpar outing from the usually talented Ernie Colón.

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