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Review: The Grim Ghost #1

Colonial-era highwayman Matthew Dunsinane is put to death, but makes a deal to do Satan’s work in the 20th century. This excellent character debut, from the team of Michael Fleisher and Ernie Colón, is one of the best single issues of the entire Atlas (Seaboard) line.

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Review: The Cougar #2

Stuntman Jeff Rand is forced to go into action as the Cougar when his brother – a werewolf! – attacks the set. This origin story, by the team of Gary Friedrich and Frank Springer, offers a great surprise ending.

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Review: The Cougar #1

When a real vampire causes trouble for a horror-movie crew, it’s up to The Cougar to save the day. Not great yet strangely enjoyable, this debut issue by Steve Mitchell, Dan Adkins and Frank Springer is fairly typical of the Atlas (Seaboard) line.

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Review: Hawkeye #4

Under the influence of Crossfire’s Undertaker Machine, Hawkeye and Mockingbird are soon forced to battle each other to the death. A surprise conclusion helps, but, ultimately, Mark Gruenwald’s auteur opus fails to meet its lofty aspirations.

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Review: Hawkeye #3

Now broke and homeless, Hawkeye and Mockingbird continue to come under attack from hired guns sent by Cross Technological Enterprises. Writer/artist Mark Gruenwald serves up some weak villains and a bland story for this miniseries’ penultimate issue.

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Review: Hawkeye #2

Hawkeye teams with Mockingbird to strike back at Cross Technological Enterprises, and soon finds himself a target of the Silencer. A competent-but-flat chapter of the Hawkeye story from the team of Mark Gruenwald and Brett Breeding.

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Review: Hawkeye #1

Hawkeye has a great new job and a lady friend, too. Time for the proverbial wheels to come off the rocket-sled! The longtime Avenger steps out in this solo outing written and penciled by Mark Gruenwald, and embellished by Brett Breeding.

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Review: The Avengers #189

Hawkeye takes a new job as a security chief at Cross Technological Enterprises and soon tangles with Deathbird. Despite strong art from John Byrne and Dan Green, this issue’s misogynistic tone is largely incompatible with today’s social norms.

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