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Review: Giant-Size Defenders #1

Clea’s efforts to reveal the Defender’s past to Valkyrie reintroduces the team to past perils. This Giant-Size outing features classic Golden and Silver age work from the likes of Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Bill Everett and Steve Ditko, along with a gorgeous framing sequence penciled by Jim Starlin.

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Review: The Avengers #146

As Captain America lies dying, the rest of the Avengers find themselves the target of the Assassin’s evil plot. Tony Isabella brings his unexpectedly strong two-parter to a surprise conclusion (or two), with less-than-sterling art (mostly) from Don Heck.

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Review: Marvel Fanfare #20

The Thing crosses through a interdimensional doorway to free Doctor Strange, who had been imprisoned by Xandu. A less-than-inspired outing from legendary Bronze Age innovator Jim Starlin, with inking from Marvel Fanfare editor Al Milgrom.

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Review: U.S. 1 #1

Ulysses Solomon “U.S.” Archer sets out with his CB-radio skull replacement and souped-up eighteen-wheeler to hunt down the maniacal Highwayman. This debut issue from Al Milgrom and Herb Trimpe isn’t as full-out awful as one might expect.

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Review: Dazzler #1

Disco singer Alison Blaire teams with superheroes, tries to find a job and wins a sing-off against the Enchantress. Not the historic stinker some recall, but this debut issue by Tom DeFalco, John Romita Jr. and Alfredo Alcala isn’t very good, either.

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Review: Doctor Strange #46

Called by a dream, Clea joins the sisterhood of Sibyls in an effort to thwart the Black Oracle prophecy. A pair of stories – including a backup with stunning art from Michael Golden and P. Craig Russell – demonstrate the underlying problem with the Doctor Strange/Clea relationship.

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Review: Morlock 2001 #2

Morlock flees from dystopic authorities and a greedy mob, turns a rail gang into fungus, then eats a couple people. This ‘70s pop-culture mash-up from writer Michael Fleisher continues, with some above-average art support from Al Milgrom.

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Review: Detective Comics #450

A hitman named Wormwood is hired to acquire Batman’s cowl – but who is really setting the trap? The lead story is a done-in-one treat from Elliot S. Maggin and Walter Simonson, while the backup tale features some nice art from Al Milgrom and Terry Austin.

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